Longform - Page 8

Why Are Christopher Nolan Fans So Intense?

EDIT
by Matt Singer November 14, 2014 @ 11:41 AM
Warner Bros.
The last time Christopher Nolan released a movie, film critics got death threats. That was back in 2012, when Nolan released ‘The Dark Knight Rises,’ and the first writers who dared to stray from the positive consensus about the film received waves of overwhelming backlash. After Marshall Fine published his pan, his site and his page on Rotten Tomatoes were both bombarded with angry comments politely requesting he “die in a fire” and hoping someone would beat him into a coma with a “thick rubber hose.”

The 50-Year-Old Virgin: How ‘Foxcatcher’ Warps Steve Carell’s Funny Persona Into Something Terrifying

EDIT
by Nick Schager November 13, 2014 @ 3:28 PM
Steve Carell’s ‘Foxcatcher’ role builds upon his solid dramatic work in 2007’s 'Dan in Real Life' and 2013’s 'The Way Way Back.' But more importantly, it’s a part that’s tailor-made for the comedian, given that it functions as something like the dark flip-side to his trademark funnyman persona.

What "What [Movie X] Gets Wrong About [Thing Y]" Reviews Get Wrong About Art

EDIT
by Matt Singer November 10, 2014 @ 1:52 PM
Paramount
In the last couple years “What [Movie X] Gets Wrong About [Thing Y]” pieces have become one of the most common types of articles in all of online film writingdom. Their popularity is not hard to explain. Dopes like me see a movie like ‘Interstellar,’ filled with incomprehensible conversations about astrophysics, and they’re curious just how fast and loose the filmmakers played with the truth. The problem comes when authors take their nitpicks one step further into the realm of criticism; when “What X Gets Wrong About Y” becomes “What X Gets Wrong About Y—And Why That Ruins The Movie.”

'BoJack Horseman' is Netflix's Best Original Show

EDIT
by Jacob Hall October 29, 2014 @ 2:04 PM
Netflix
'BoJack Horseman' isn't just a very funny, very clever and very smart comedy, it may be the best original program that Netflix has produced yet. Seriously. Go ahead and let the trashy soap opera antics of 'House of Cards' steal the glory at the Emmy nominations! 'BoJack Horseman' is the kind of show that's too good and too cool for awards.

Making Sense of 'Saw'’s Jumbled Jigsaw Mythology

EDIT
by Nick Schager October 29, 2014 @ 12:40 PM
Lionsgate
'Saw' turns ten this year, and while the franchise’s “torture porn” legacy is clear, its serialized story – spanning seven squirm-inducing films – remains anything but. Few cinematic series have ever told a continuous tale with less grace, intelligibility and basic common sense than 'Saw' (as a quick, headache-inducing peek at its Wikipedia page confirms). Nonetheless, there is some sort of method to the maddening mythology surrounding puzzle-loving fiend Jigsaw (Tobin Bell), as we discovered upon revisiting James Wan and Leigh Whannell’s genre efforts. Concerned with cancer, revenge, and all sorts of righteous moralizing, the killer’s various machinations are a righteous mess that, on the original’s tenth anniversary, we finally try to clean up, via this rundown of what Jigsaw’s really up to – and why, and how – throughout his insanely elaborate deadly-trap saga.

The Difference Between a Great Horror Movie and a Great Halloween Movie

EDIT
by Jacob Hall October 21, 2014 @ 9:49 AM
Warner Bros.
I never watch 'Halloween' on Halloween. That's not to say that I dislike John Carpenter's slasher classic. In fact, it's one of the best horror movies ever made and a masterpiece that I find myself revisiting at least once a year. But when I do revisit it, I tend to watch it in December. Or February. Or even in the heat of the July. The moment October rolls around, I shelve any interest I have in it. And it's not alone. You won't find me revisiting a lot of famous, respected and beloved horror movies when the season of the witch rolls around.

Reel Women: How Jennifer Lawrence and Womansplainer Show a Need for 'He for She'

EDIT
by Britt Hayes October 10, 2014 @ 1:00 PM
Getty Images
This week, Jennifer Lawrence finally broke her silence regarding the massive hack that resulted in her nude photos (as well as those of several other female celebrities) being released onto the internet, aptly describing the incident as a "sex crime." Meanwhile, Reddit users are actually suggesting that Lawrence and other victims of the hacking attack unite to contribute to a fund to develop powerful encryption software. Why is it that, when women are put under attack, the onus is on us to clean up the mess?