Longform - Page 8

Who Ya Gonna Call? The Inside Story Of The 'Ghostbusters' Music Video

EDIT
by Mike Ryan June 6, 2014 @ 9:00 AM
Sony Pictures
In early 1984, the team behind ‘Ghostbusters’ was fairly confident that they had a hit. Test screenings had gone well, but for director Ivan Reitman, something was missing. What Reitman wanted was a song, only 20 seconds or so in length, near the opening of the film as the then soon-to-be Ghostbusters -- Peter Venkman (Bill Murray), Ray Stantz (Dan Aykroyd) and Egon Spengler (Harold Ramis) –- enter the New York Public Library.

'Edge of Tomorrow' and the Influence of Video Games on Modern Movies

EDIT
by Jacob Hall June 5, 2014 @ 12:00 PM
Warner Bros.
Video game movies suck. It's a scientific fact.
No matter how popular it may have been among gamers, a great video game seems instantly doomed whenever it attempts to jump to the big screen. Whatever made it tick is inevitably lost in translation...

The Bizarre Case of the 1978 'Doctor Strange' Movie

EDIT
by Mike Ryan June 4, 2014 @ 11:30 AM
CBS
With Tuesday’s announcement that Scott Derrickson will be directing 'Doctor Strange' – a character that’s considered a bit of a risk, at least by Marvel standards, but has always been a favorite of studio head Kevin Feige – it’s kind of remarkable that there’s somehow already been a Doctor Strange movie.

In the Beginning, There Was 'X-Men': Revisiting the Superhero Movie That Started It All

EDIT
by Jacob Hall May 23, 2014 @ 9:00 AM
20th Century Fox
For better or worse, the current status of the superhero movie can be tracked back to one film. One modestly budgeted production designed the template and set the tone for a film movement that still hasn't peaked. Some remember it fondly. Some think it got more wrong than it did right. But there's no denying it: Bryan Singer's 'X-Men' is undoubtedly one of the most important and influential films of the past two decades.

World Weary: Why Not Every Superhero Franchise Needs a Universe of Its Own

EDIT
by Mike Ryan May 20, 2014 @ 1:44 PM
Sony Pictures/Marvel/20th Century Fox, Illustration by ScreenCrush.com
People love universes. Or, more precisely: People love fictional universes. At least, I hear much more about the Marvel universe and the ‘Star Wars’ universe these days than our own infinitely fascinating real universe, but I digress. This isn’t inherently a bad thing – it’s not too surprising that serialized stories, which is really what we mean when we talk about universes – are popular. If a person likes a character, why shouldn’t he or she want to see more of that character?

Why Seth Rogen is the Most Important Person in Modern Comedy

EDIT
by Jacob Hall May 8, 2014 @ 12:30 PM
Taylor Hill, Getty Images
Like so many comedic actors, Seth Rogen seems to have a type. He's the lovable schlub, the agreeable, pot-smoking best friend who avoids conflict until absolutely necessary. It's easy to watch him in a handful of his biggest hits, peg him as a funny, one-trick pony and move on. But, you'd be making a big mistake.
Sure, Rogen has a default persona, but his career is not defined by his popular image. Rather, his career is defined in the fringes and in the subtleties, where he takes what's expected of him and delivers something completely different. Rogen's greatest trick is that he's quietly become the most important person working in film comedy today, all without calling attention to his accomplishments.

The Other ‘Neighbors’ - Revisiting the Disastrous and Tragic Belushi and Aykroyd Comedy

EDIT
by Mike Ryan May 8, 2014 @ 11:30 AM
It’s a little surprising that, with a huge summer-movie-season-comedy like ‘Neighbors’ opening in theaters this weekend, there hasn’t been more talk about the other movie titled ‘Neighbors,’ even in passing. Well, that’s not entirely true, because I’ve mentioned it a couple of times in conversation and the response has been usually some sort of version of a blank stare.
Maybe the people who are old enough to remember 1981’s 'Neighbors' don’t want to remember 'Neighbors,' for a plethora of reasons. The most obvious: It was John Belushi’s last film before dying of a speedball overdose.