Longform - Page 9

What "What [Movie X] Gets Wrong About [Thing Y]" Reviews Get Wrong About Art

by Matt Singer November 10, 2014 @ 1:52 PM
In the last couple years “What [Movie X] Gets Wrong About [Thing Y]” pieces have become one of the most common types of articles in all of online film writingdom. Their popularity is not hard to explain. Dopes like me see a movie like ‘Interstellar,’ filled with incomprehensible conversations about astrophysics, and they’re curious just how fast and loose the filmmakers played with the truth. The problem comes when authors take their nitpicks one step further into the realm of criticism; when “What X Gets Wrong About Y” becomes “What X Gets Wrong About Y—And Why That Ruins The Movie.”

'BoJack Horseman' is Netflix's Best Original Show

by Jacob Hall October 29, 2014 @ 2:04 PM
'BoJack Horseman' isn't just a very funny, very clever and very smart comedy, it may be the best original program that Netflix has produced yet. Seriously. Go ahead and let the trashy soap opera antics of 'House of Cards' steal the glory at the Emmy nominations! 'BoJack Horseman' is the kind of show that's too good and too cool for awards.

Making Sense of 'Saw'’s Jumbled Jigsaw Mythology

by Nick Schager October 29, 2014 @ 12:40 PM
'Saw' turns ten this year, and while the franchise’s “torture porn” legacy is clear, its serialized story – spanning seven squirm-inducing films – remains anything but. Few cinematic series have ever told a continuous tale with less grace, intelligibility and basic common sense than 'Saw' (as a quick, headache-inducing peek at its Wikipedia page confirms). Nonetheless, there is some sort of method to the maddening mythology surrounding puzzle-loving fiend Jigsaw (Tobin Bell), as we discovered upon revisiting James Wan and Leigh Whannell’s genre efforts. Concerned with cancer, revenge, and all sorts of righteous moralizing, the killer’s various machinations are a righteous mess that, on the original’s tenth anniversary, we finally try to clean up, via this rundown of what Jigsaw’s really up to – and why, and how – throughout his insanely elaborate deadly-trap saga.

The Difference Between a Great Horror Movie and a Great Halloween Movie

by Jacob Hall October 21, 2014 @ 9:49 AM
Warner Bros.
I never watch 'Halloween' on Halloween. That's not to say that I dislike John Carpenter's slasher classic. In fact, it's one of the best horror movies ever made and a masterpiece that I find myself revisiting at least once a year. But when I do revisit it, I tend to watch it in December. Or February. Or even in the heat of the July. The moment October rolls around, I shelve any interest I have in it. And it's not alone. You won't find me revisiting a lot of famous, respected and beloved horror movies when the season of the witch rolls around.

Reel Women: How Jennifer Lawrence and Womansplainer Show a Need for 'He for She'

by Britt Hayes October 10, 2014 @ 1:00 PM
Getty Images
This week, Jennifer Lawrence finally broke her silence regarding the massive hack that resulted in her nude photos (as well as those of several other female celebrities) being released onto the internet, aptly describing the incident as a "sex crime." Meanwhile, Reddit users are actually suggesting that Lawrence and other victims of the hacking attack unite to contribute to a fund to develop powerful encryption software. Why is it that, when women are put under attack, the onus is on us to clean up the mess?

Big Strides on the Small Screen: Why This Fall Is a Major Season for LGBT on TV

by Nick Romano October 10, 2014 @ 11:00 AM
On Thursday, September 25, 'How to Get Away with Murder' lit the blogosphere on fire. The series, executive produced by 'Scandal' creator Shonda Rhimes, featured actors Jack Falahee and Conrad Ricamora in flagrante, fiercely making out with each other before ripping each others' clothes off. The following week, these two were at it again, "only this time, I get to do you," said Ricamora's Oliver. And that's apparently only a steamy preview of what's coming up.

'Birdman' is Excellent, But Michael Keaton is Not Birdman

by Mike Ryan October 10, 2014 @ 10:19 AM
Fox Searchlight
In Alejandro González Iñárritu’s ‘Birdman’ (which will close the New York Film Festival this weekend and, I'll add, is my favorite movie of the year), Michael Keaton plays Riggan Thomson, a veteran actor whose biggest claim to fame is that he used to be in a series of superhero movies. Now, Riggan is attempting to make his comeback by staging a Broadway play based on a Raymond Carver short story. It’s been lost on no one that Michael Keaton also used to be in a series of superhero movies and hasn’t had the most prolific output over the last 15 years – and is, now, making a comeback (of sorts) with ‘Birdman.’ For his part, Michael Keaton is distancing himself from this comparison, telling New York Magazine, “I related less to him than almost every other character I’ve played, in terms of the desperation.”

The Best 'Dracula' Movie Hasn't Even Been Made Yet

by Jacob Hall October 9, 2014 @ 3:55 PM
While it's true that great stretches of Stoker's novel have been explored, transformed and extended by countless filmmakers over the years until every surprise feels like a cliche, there's one stretch of the story that feels fresher than ever. Upon a recent revisit to the novel, it was this portion of the book that most ignited the imagination and felt the most inherently cinematic. And yet, it's the portion of the book that gets overlooked in even the most faithful adaptations.