Movie Reviews - Page 5

‘Man Vs. Snake’ Is the Documentary Every Video-Game Lover Should See

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by Matt Singer September 30, 2015 @ 1:43 PM
Everyone wants to believe they’re special. When I was in second grade, I was a multiplication table genius. A gift for rote memorization and an intense competitive streak turned me into the Michael Jordan of Math Class Around the World. Almost 30 years later, I still remember playing and winning, probably because that was the last time in my life I really felt truly superior to everyone around me.

‘The Invitation’ Review: Karyn Kusama’s Fierce Drama Pulls No Punches

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by Britt Hayes September 28, 2015 @ 1:15 PM
Drafthouse Films
After being dealt some bad luck in the studio system with the underwhelming action flick Aeon Flux and the undervalued horror comedy Jennifer’s Body, director Karyn Kusama emerges with her best film since she made her feature debut with 2000's Girlfight. The Invitation is an exceptionally unnerving thriller, a sharp study in the horrors of platonic indulgence and the over-extension of courtesy.

‘Demon’ Review: A Horror Movie as Tragic as It Is Terrifying

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by Matt Singer September 28, 2015 @ 9:52 AM
Seven days before Demon made its U.S. premiere at Fantastic Fest 2015, its director, Marcin Wrona, died in a hotel room in Poland. He was 42 years old. The preliminary autopsy indicates Wrona committed suicide. If Wrona was alive and well, Demon would still be a brilliant film, an impressive and inventive blend of psychological horror and sardonic comedy. But his suicide casts the entire film in a whole new light, and adds even more poignance to the already heart-rending story of a seemingly happy man who succumbs to an inexplicable breakdown at his wedding.

Review: ‘The Walk’ Fails to Capture the Beauty of the Twin Tower High-Wire Feat

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by Erin Whitney September 27, 2015 @ 12:25 PM
Sony Pictures
Following a press screening of Robert Zemeckis’ The Walk, the opening film at the New York Film Festival, the director said part of what inspired his movie was that Philippe Petit’s real-life walk was never captured on film. While there are photographs of Petit walking on a high-wire between the Twin Towers on August 7, 1974, as explored in the Oscar-winning documentary Man on Wire, video footage of his audacious illegal performance doesn’t exist. In the film, Zemeckis attempts to turn the thrilling walk into an immersive experience with 3D and IMAX, but some moments, especially ones as majestic as Petit’s walk, should remain an unseen mystery.

Review: ‘The Lobster’ Offers an Uncanny, Definitive Look at Relationships

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by Britt Hayes September 26, 2015 @ 12:29 PM
Alchemy
In 2013, Spike Jonze delivered one of the most poignant and thoughtful meditations on the complexities of relationships and humanity with Her. Two years later and Yorgos Lanthimos has given us what is perhaps the most definitive relationship film in years with The Lobster, a movie that explores the full spectrum of relationships with impeccable wit, delightfully dark humor and insights so sharp they verge on deadly.

Review: ‘The Wave’ Shows What’s Wrong With Recent American Disaster Movies

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by Matt Singer September 25, 2015 @ 10:05 AM
Magnolia
The Wave really is just about one single wave that decimates a Norwegian town, and its impact on a small group of characters, primarily a geologist and his family. That’s it — but that’s all it needs to be. This film is a reminder that disaster movies work best when they focus on the characters and their struggles, not the big special effects they’re running from.

‘The Green Inferno’ Review: A Proper Throwback to Cannibal Horror Films of the 70s

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by Britt Hayes September 24, 2015 @ 12:57 PM
Exclusive Media Group
It's been six years since director Eli Roth released 'Hostel Part 2,' after which he starred in a Quentin Tarantino movie and a horror movie directed by his pal Nicholas Lopez that he also produced and co-wrote. Saying that 'The Green Inferno' is...

‘Finders Keepers’ Review: An Epic Battle Over an Amputated Leg

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by Matt Singer September 23, 2015 @ 1:20 PM
The Orchard
Here’s a fun game to play: See how long you can go randomly flipping channels through your cable package before you stumble across a reality television show dedicated to the outlandish exploits of rednecks. There’s Duck Dynasty on A&E, Redneck Island on CMT, Swamp People on History, and only about 100 other ones spread out across dozens of channels. The documentation (and exploitation) of Southern culture has become an entire cottage industry on cable TV, one that the book Hillbilly: A Cultural History of an American Icon by Anthony Harkins (as quoted in this BuzzFeed article) claims can be tied to an American urge that arises “during moments of economic tension ... mass media rednecks help the American middle class blow off some steam and feel a little more secure."

‘Room’ Review: See It Without Tissues at Your Own Risk

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by Matt Singer September 18, 2015 @ 8:43 AM
A24
If you feeling like throw up for a couple hours, take a look at the Wikipedia page for the Elisabeth Fritzl case. Fritzl was imprisoned in 1984 by her father Josef; she didn’t escape until 2008. In the intervening years, Josef repeatedly raped his daughter, and she gave birth to seven of his children; four of them remained incarcerated with Elisabeth, while the other three were adopted by Josef and his wife (he claimed he found them abandoned). Finally, after 24 years of the worst torture imaginable, Elisabeth managed to break free.

‘Black Mass’ Review: Johnny Depp as a Wicked Boston Gangster

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by Matt Singer September 16, 2015 @ 2:29 PM
Warner Bros.
Jawny Depp can be a great actuh. But at a certain point in the recent past, Jawny seemed to stop looking faw great material and stahted looking faw anything that would affawd him the awppawtunity to put on a crazy wig and speak in a weeuhd accent. In the past few yeeuhs he’s played a vampiyuh with crazy hair and a weeuhd accent, a Native American with a bird on his head and a weeuhd accent, a Canadian detective with a fake nose and a weeuhd accent, a singing wolf with crazy hair and a weeuhd accent, a British art thief with a crazy mustache and a weeuhd accent, and now, in Black Mass, he’s James “Whitey” Bulgah, with thinning hair and a thick Bahston accent. Do you think Jawny even remembuhs what he really sounds like at this point?