Ben Wheatley

‘Free Fire’ Review: An Audacious, Monotonous, Feature-Length Shootout

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by Matt Singer September 9, 2016 @ 1:13 PM
A24
I’ve already heard one colleague refer to Ben Wheatley’s Free Fire, in which an arms deal goes wrong and escalates into an almost 90-minute-long shootout, as a kind of cinematic high-wire act. But high-wire acts don’t last 90 minutes; watching somebody balance on a wire for 90 minutes would get pretty boring if that’s all they were doing. There’s an audaciousness to Free Fire that’s self-defeating. Yes, Wheatley pulled off a feature-length gun battle. But the result is so monotonous that I ran out of patience long before the participants ran out of bullets.

‘Free Fire’ Red Band Trailer Skips the Small Talk and Heads Straight For the Guns

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by Britt Hayes September 9, 2016 @ 8:37 AM
It’s about time. After months of waiting, the first (red band!) trailer for Free Fire has arrived on the heels of last night’s midnight premiere at TIFF. The latest thriller from Ben Wheatley (Kill List, High-Rise) features an all-star roster, including Oscar-winner Brie Larson, Cillian Murphy, Armie Hammer and Wheatley favorite Michael Smiley in the story of an arms deal gone terribly wrong.

Ben Wheatley Is the Latest Director to Shoot a Radiohead Video

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by Matthew Monagle July 2, 2016 @ 2:34 PM
Ghoulardi Film Company
As part of their release strategy for their newest album, Radiohead has targeted some of the most influential modern filmmakers to shoot music videos or short vignettes for their songs. The biggest of these was undoubtedly Paul Thomas Anderson, whose “Daydreaming” video was released back in May and even played prior to movies at several arthouse theaters across the countries. And now, Radiohead has added British filmmaker Ben Wheatley to the fold with a short vignette for their song “Ful Stop”.

Life in the ‘High-Rise’ Trailer Is Very Satisfying

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by Charles Bramesco February 9, 2016 @ 11:56 AM
StudioCanal
Last month, my home city of Washington, D.C. got a couple feet of snow and I spent three days holed up in my apartment. That brief 72-hour span alone nearly drove me to the brink of insanity, and so I suppose I get where the characters in the J.G. Ballard adaptation High-Rise are coming from. Their luxury apartment complex has sufficient amenities to make entering the outside world unnecessary, and so of course they all devolve into warlike tribes and turn on one another in an orgy of bourgeois social angling gone violent. A few days of snow nearly had me talking to cantaloupes with faces painted on them; life in a high-rise, even a fabulously posh one, would be more than enough to get me to eat my landlord‘s dog.

‘High-Rise’ Trailer: Tom Hiddleston Surrenders to Madness

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by Britt Hayes January 7, 2016 @ 5:46 PM
By now you’ve heard the buzz surrounding High-Rise, the new film from director Ben Wheatley, the deranged and brilliant mind behind films like Kill List, A Field in England and Sightseers. That buzz is well-earned for Wheatley’s latest, which is based on the novel by J.G. Ballard (Drive) and features an incredible lineup, including Tom Hiddleston, Elisabeth Moss, Luke Evans and more. A new trailer has arrived, offering a tantalizing and slightly unnerving glimpse inside the titular high-rise, and teasing the evolving (or devolving) psyche of the residents within.

Ben Wheatley to Remake Classic Thriller ‘The Wages of Fear’

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by Charles Bramesco November 18, 2015 @ 10:32 AM
Distributors Corporation of America
Ben Wheatley is in the process of signing a deal to remake the classic thriller The Wages of Fear for eOne. Directed by Henri-Georges Clouzot of Diabolique fame, the original 1953 film followed a quartet of doomed Europeans transporting two trucks full of nitroglycerine through the mountains to an exploding oil well in Mexico so that the flame can be extinguished.

‘High-Rise’ Review: A Slick and Sleek Monument to Madness

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by Britt Hayes September 30, 2015 @ 2:44 PM
StudioCanal
Director Ben Wheatley and his screenwriting partner Amy Jump are known for their specific, darkly humorous sensibilities, from the horror thriller Kill List to the black and white psychedelic intensity of A Field in England, and the bleak hilarity of Sightseers. The duo return this year with High-Rise, based on J.G. Ballard’s sophisticated dystopian tale of class warfare in an elegant apartment block. It may be his most inaccessible and tonally ambitious film to date, but it also might be his best.