Maggie Gyllenhaal

'Frank' Trailer: Michael Fassbender Wears a Mask, Starts a Rock Band

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by Jacob Hall March 6, 2014 @ 2:46 PM
Element Pictures
http://youtu.be/Wk-hWzq67w4
'Frank' is a movie that has the audacity to cast a known face like Michael Fassbender in the lead role and then hide him in a giant, silly-looking fake head for the entire running time. In other words, it's our kind of weird. The film was a big hit at the Sundance Film Festival -- where we gave it a sparkling review -- and with the first 'Frank' trailer, you can see why. This movie looks crazy and, more importantly, crazy good.

'Frank' Review

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by Jordan Hoffman January 18, 2014 @ 3:41 PM
Sundance
Mixing genres never works, especially surrealist comedy and character-based drama. Indie filmmakers often try it, and the seesaw of quirk and forced pathos is what makes people roll their eyes and wish for "a real movie." But once in a while it does work - and when it does, as with Lenny Abrahamson's 'Frank,' the result is something of a miracle.
'Frank,' co-written by Peter Straughan ('Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy') and Jon Ronson (the journalist/author of 'The Men Who Stare at Goats' and 'The Psychopath Test') and starring Domhnall Gleeson, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Scoot McNairy and, wearing that ridiculous papier-mache head, Michael Fassbender, is a readymade cult classic.

Maggie Gyllenhaal To Star In 'White House Down'

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by George Roush June 7, 2012 @ 6:30 PM
Getty Images
Maggie Gyllenhaal, despite all of the successful movies she's been in and the long career she's had, always seems to be a surprise announcement when she's cast in movies. Not because she shouldn't be in them, but because she doesn't seem to be in enough of them. Now her fans have one more reason to go to the theater with this recent casting announcement.

Trailer for 'Hysteria' Dances Around Its Risque Subject

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by Jacob Hall April 14, 2012 @ 1:32 PM
There are two problems when it comes to making a movie where the main subject is sex. First of all, how do secure funding for a film that where the intended audience is adults and not teenage boys? Secondly, how do you market that films to an unsuspecting public? 'Hysteria' obviously solved problem number one, but how do they dance around problem number two? Well, check out the trailer yourself.