Liam Neeson

Liam Neeson Is Officially Retiring From Action Movies
Liam Neeson Is Officially Retiring From Action Movies
Liam Neeson has a particular set of skills, a set of skills has acquired over a very long career. In recent years, those skills have frequently been put to use in films where Neeson plays fathers and former government professionals burdened by personal demons, who wear leather jackets and yell at bad guys over cell phones. But Liam Neeson is, in his own words, “sixty-f—ing-five,” and it appears that he is officially getting too old for this s—.
Liam Neeson Is Deep Throat in the ‘Mark Felt’ Trailer
Liam Neeson Is Deep Throat in the ‘Mark Felt’ Trailer
If you’ve taken a history class, you know about Watergate, and you know it was “Deep Throat,” the FBI insider who brought the scandal down with secret phone calls to The Washington Post. But it wasn’t until 2005 that the public learned of Deep Throat’s true identity: he was Mark Felt, a special agent and the FBI’s Associate Director from 1972-73. In the new film Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House, Felt is played by the suitably deep-voiced Liam Neeson.
Watch Liam Neeson as Deep Throat in ‘The Silent Man’ Clip
Watch Liam Neeson as Deep Throat in ‘The Silent Man’ Clip
It’s not an exact science, making movies. Plenty of projects get stuck in the suspended animation of development, and even those that move forward do so at a gradual pace. But sometimes, everything works out just perfectly: two years ago, I reported on a picture called Felt, a biopic of Watergate informant Mark ‘Deep Throat’ Felt starring Liam Neeson in the title role. I forgot about the item soon afterward, but production has been chugging along for the past couple of years, and director Peter Landesman is preparing to unveil this new film at the most perfect time imaginable. You can plan for a lot, but it takes a stroke of divine generosity for a full-scale Presidential treason investigation to break out around the time you release your Watergate movie.
‘Love Actually’ Is (Still) All Around in New Red Nose Day Reunion Trailer
‘Love Actually’ Is (Still) All Around in New Red Nose Day Reunion Trailer
I could pretend to be one of those Love Actually haters (read: everyone on the internet) and say a bunch of snooty things about the beloved rom-com and its upcoming reunion sequel. I could say, “Oh gosh, here we go again with the most overrated holiday romance of the century,” or drop a couple hot takes about how it’s actually a terrible or misogynistic movie. But the truth is, (oh god, I’m about to publicly out myself here…) I love Love Actually, and I don’t care what you think. So I found the new trailer for the reunion short film in honor of Red Nose Day, kind of stupidly cute? Sue me.
Watch the First Teaser for the ‘Love Actually’ Reunion
Watch the First Teaser for the ‘Love Actually’ Reunion
Last month we learned that director Richard Curtis was reuniting with the cast of his beloved (and annually derided) 2003 holiday classic Love Actually for a new short film in honor of Red Nose Day. The short will premiere during this year’s Red Nose Day Special in May, but you don’t have to wait that long to see how much your favorite characters have changed, as NBC has released the first teaser — which sees the whole cast revisiting the iconic moment when Andrew Lincoln adorably / creepily shows up on Keira Knightley’s doorstep with a series of messages.
Fire up the Batcomputer for Some ‘Batman Begins’ Facts
Fire up the Batcomputer for Some ‘Batman Begins’ Facts
If you’ve seen Christopher Nolan’s Batman Begins, you probably remember the great scene where Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) and Ducard (Liam Neeson) fight on a frozen lake. But did you know that all throughout the day Bale and Neeson shot this scene, they could hear cracks in the ice beneath their feet? When the crew returned to the lake the next day, the entire thing had thawed. Yikes. That’s just one of the facts featured in the newest episode of You Think You Know Movies!
‘Silence’ Review: Martin Scorsese’s Exhausting Religious Epic
‘Silence’ Review: Martin Scorsese’s Exhausting Religious Epic
Martin Scorsese has reportedly been trying to make an English-language adaptation of Shūsaku Endō’s novel Silence for upwards of 25 years. Watching the finished movie, it’s easy to see why he fought so hard to make it — and why it took so long to get someone to finance and distribute it. Silence encapsulates many of Scorsese’s most deeply felt themes; ideas about faith, sin, and guilt he’s considered in film after film for decades. But it does so in a package that is slow, dry, and a little monotonous. Fans (there will certainly be some, and not without reason) will hail Silence as a passionate and perceptive career summation. Silence’s critics will likely agree — while wishing that summation wasn’t such a slog.
‘Silence’ Is Brutal in New International Trailer
‘Silence’ Is Brutal in New International Trailer
As Silence prepares to hit select theaters this weekend (the rest of you will have to wait until January), Paramount has unveiled a new international trailer for Martin Scorsese’s long-developing passion project — an epic drama based on Japanese author Shusaku Endo’s acclaimed novel. There are a couple of notable things about this trailer for Silence: For one, it’s a bit more intense than the domestic versions, and because it’s a Japanese trailer, the Japanese cast members are more prominently featured.
‘Silence’ Trailer: It’s Real, It’s Here, and It’s Magnificent
‘Silence’ Trailer: It’s Real, It’s Here, and It’s Magnificent
Paramount hasn't been historically known for their baller moves, but when it comes to their bold anti-promotional campaign for Martin Scorsese's Silence, game must recognize game. Keeping a major awards horse almost entirely on the down-low until one month before its December 23 release is one thing; when that movie also happens to be a passion project decades in the making from what very well might be our greatest living filmmaker — American or otherwise — well, that's just showing off. A Martin Scorsese movie sells itself, and Paramount has now reminded the moviegoing public of why that is.

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