Inside Out

‘Inside Out’ Earns Pixar Its Eighth Best Animated Feature Oscar

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by Matt Singer February 28, 2016 @ 9:53 PM
Disney/Pixar
Take a seat, Sadness. It’s Joy’s night. That’s because Inside Out triumphed in a very competitive category (that also included Shaun the Sheep Movie and the truly outstanding Anomalisa) to take home the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature at this year’s Oscars. It’s the second Best Animated Feature win for director Pete Docter (2009’s Up was the first) and the eighth win for Pixar Animation Studios (the other six, for those keeping score at home, are Finding Nemo, The Incredibles, Ratatouille, Wall-E, Toy Story 3, and Brave).

Why Can’t an Animated Film Be Nominated For Best Director at the Oscars?

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by Mike Sampson January 12, 2016 @ 11:01 AM
Getty Images
There’s a director who has been nominated for six Oscars. He even won once. His 2015 film was a critical and commercial success. It made over $350 million and has a 98 percent on Rotten Tomatoes.
There’s another director who has been nominated for...

The Best Movies of 2015 (According to Erin Whitney)

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by Erin Whitney December 16, 2015 @ 11:00 AM
Fox Searchlight/Netflix/Disney•Pixar
Lists can be extremely useful, especially when you need to get organized, go grocery shopping or break down all the ways Jon Snow will return on Game of Thrones (very important). I like those kinds of lists, as the many Post-Its littered across my desk (and Macbook and iPhone) will show you. But making a Top 10 for the best movies of the year is a whole other monster, a film writer’s Sophie’s Choice. For someone as ridiculously indecisive as myself, it took days to finalize the final spots on this list.

The Best Movies of 2015 (According to Matt Singer)

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by Matt Singer December 15, 2015 @ 9:12 AM
There are just too many good movies. That’s my takeaway from this year’s annual exercise in critical masochism selecting the ten best films. My shortlist of 2015’s best movies is anything but short; running well over 30 outstanding entries. It feels like something I say every year, but it’s true; there are more great movies left off my list (like Clouds of Sils Maria and Experimenter and Brooklyn and Heaven Knows What and While We’re Young and about 20 others) than are actually on it. I actively agonized over the last couple slots for hours. (Yes, actual hours. I’m sorry, It Follows.)

Sight and Sound Names Best Films of 2015; ‘The Assassin,’ ‘Carol’ and ‘Fury Road’ Come Out on Top

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by Charles Bramesco November 30, 2015 @ 8:40 AM
Warner Bros.
The British Film Institute’s official publication brings a global perspective to their rulings, having polled 168 critics worldwide on their favorite releases of the past calendar year.

10 ‘Inside Out’ Facts To Fill Your Brain With Joy

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by ScreenCrush Staff November 12, 2015 @ 12:53 PM
There are five key emotions in Pixar’s Inside Out: Joy, Sadness, Anger, Fear, and Disgust. But did you know there were originally over 20 emotions that were going to appear? That’s just one of the surprising facts packed into the latest episode of You Think You Know Movies, which journeys deep into the inner recesses of the Memory Dump to bring you this episode all about Inside Out.

Previewing the ‘Inside Out’ and ‘Anomalisa’ Animated Oscar Showdown

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by Erin Whitney November 5, 2015 @ 2:01 PM
Disney•Pixar/Paramount Pictures
What qualities signify the best movie of the year? Could it be one that thoughtfully examines the human condition in the most striking way? Perhaps one that makes you laugh as much as it makes you cry and introspect over hard-to-swallow truths. Maybe even a movie that’s so visually dynamic its detailed beauty elevates the wonder of its evocative story. Now here’s the kicker: what if that movie was animated?

Meet the ‘Inside Out’ Emotions That Were Cut From the Film

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by Erin Whitney November 2, 2015 @ 11:34 AM
Before Joy, Fear, Sadness, Anger and Disgust made the cut, 21 other emotions were considered for Pixar’s Inside Out. In a new special feature from the upcoming DVD for the animated film, courtesy of USA Today, director Pete Docter reveals the various emotions that were initially considered for Riley.