Michael Keaton

‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’ Star Tom Holland Reveals Six-Film Contract, Michael Keaton Confirmed as Vulture

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by Britt Hayes November 9, 2016 @ 12:36 PM
Marvel
X-Men isn’t the only superhero franchise with some major updates today — there’s also some interesting new info from Sony and Marvel’s upcoming Spider-Man reboot. Homecoming star Tom Holland has revealed the details of his contract with both studios, while Marvel Studios head Kevin Feige has offered official confirmation of Michael Keaton’s villainous role in the new Spidey film.

Dylan O’Brien Gets a Gun (and a Beard?) in New ‘American Assassin’ Photos

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by Emma Stefansky November 2, 2016 @ 7:20 PM
Lionsgate
When he’s not running in mazes or being welcomed to the Scorch, Dylan O’Brien is a black ops assassin ready to handle the CIA’s most sensitive crimes. O’Brien stars as Mitch Rapp, a counterterrorism operative who has to stop a maniac from starting a third world war in American Assassin. The film is based on the first of a 15-book-long series by Vince Flynn, and if this one does well in theaters, we can expect a whole lot more, as this is the first in a planned franchise.

Michael Keaton Thinks the ‘Beetlejuice 2’ Ship Has Sailed

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by Matthew Monagle July 27, 2016 @ 7:01 PM
Warner Bros.
How’s this for awkward timing: just as an entire generation of moviegoers are rediscovering their love for Winona Ryder thanks to Stranger Things, her chances at reappearing in the role that made her famous may be dying on the vine. The last time we checked in on Beetlejuice 2, it was Ryder who thought the sequel might actually be happening. Now it is Michael Keaton, her costar from the original film, who seems determined to put the final nail in the coffin.

‘The Founder’ Moves to December to Supersize Those Awards Season Chances

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by Britt Hayes July 13, 2016 @ 3:22 PM
The Weinstein Company
With recent awards favorite Michael Keaton and a movie based on a true story about good ol’ fashioned capitalism, it seemed a little odd that The Founder was scheduled to hit theaters in August — especially when it was put up against Suicide Squad. It appears that The Weinstein Company has come to its senses and remembered how much they enjoy Oscar season, as The Founder has officially been pushed back to December.

‘The Founder’ Trailer: Do You Want Fries With That McDonald’s Biopic?

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by Matt Singer April 21, 2016 @ 10:00 AM
The Weinstein Company
McDonald’s has been an American institution for so long that people just taken for granted. It is a part of the fabric of this country, like baseball, apple pie, and sitcoms with laugh tracks. But McDonald’s wasn’t always this ubiquitous. Someone had to make a massive success. And that man was Ray Kroc.

‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’ Eyes Michael Keaton to Play Villain Role

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by Britt Hayes April 13, 2016 @ 5:16 PM
Fox Searchlight
It’s all very much happening — following Sony and Marvel’s reveal of the official title and logo for Spider-Man: Homecoming, casting has already begun, as the studios are eyeing Michael Keaton for a villainous role in the web-slinger’s new reboot. Although Vulture was recently rumored to be a villain in the film, it’s unclear if this is the role Keaton would play, though it would keep the Birdman star in familiar, um, territory.

‘Spotlight’ Review: A Great Journalism Movie and a Surefire Oscar Contender

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by Matt Singer September 15, 2015 @ 8:29 AM
Open Road
Spotlight is a story about the way things used to be done; a model of journalism in which a reporter might publish one article a year rather than one article a day (or, God help us, an hour). It follows the “Spotlight” unit of The Boston Globe, a four-person team of reporters who investigate big stories for as long as they need. In 2001, Martin Baron (Liev Schreiber) became the new editor of the Globe, and assigned the Spotlight writers the case of a Catholic priest accused of molesting numerous children. But rather than simply cover that one story, the Spotlight staff dug deeper into the Catholic Church’s history of hiding such crimes by moving priests from one place to another. Their work exposed systemic abuse stretching back decades and ultimately won a Pulitzer Prize… but wasn’t published until 2002.