Will Poulter

‘Detroit’ Review: Kathryn Bigelow’s Harrowing Historical Drama
‘Detroit’ Review: Kathryn Bigelow’s Harrowing Historical Drama
Shortly after midnight on June 25, 1967, shots were heard outside of the Algiers Motel in Detroit, Michigan. A group of state and local policemen and National Guardsmen entered the motel looking for an alleged sniper. The night ended with three black teenagers dead and nine others brutally beaten. The horrific incident, which took place during the Detroit riot, is the focus of Kathryn Bigelow’s latest examination of American history. An excellent piece of powerful, dramatic filmmaking, Detroit is one of the most harrowing films you’ll see this year with a wealth of charged performances. But Bigelow’s film, written by Mark Boal (Zero Dark Thirty, The Hurt Locker), suffers from too broad a title – this movie should more accurately be titled The Algiers Motel – and thus too broad a scope.
Violence Erupts in the First ‘Detroit’ TV Spot
Violence Erupts in the First ‘Detroit’ TV Spot
Every major historical movie comes with a choice. Do you go seek the true story behind the film’s events in an attempt to be well-read prior to its release? Or do you embrace your ignorance  —  albeit temporarily  —  in order to ensure the sanctity of the cinematic experience? It isn’t difficult to find in-depth literature about the film; Wayne State University Press recently re-released The Detroit Riot of 1967, a first-hand account by the former aide to the Detroit police commissioner who now serves as the Dean of Public Affairs at the University of Michigan. In many ways, Kathryn Bigelow’s Detroit seems to be setting a historical precedent for the abuse of power stories we see in every city across America.
Anthony Mackie Joins Kathryn Bigelow’s Detroit Riots Film
Anthony Mackie Joins Kathryn Bigelow’s Detroit Riots Film
We didn’t think we could get much more excited about Kathryn Bigelow’s new project, but then the Oscar-winning director began assembling her cast, and it’s already pretty impressive. Joining John Boyega in the untitled Detroit riots drama are The Revenant’s Will Poulter, Sing Street’s Jack Reynor, Ben O’Toole and Anthony Mackie — the latter of whom previously worked with Bigelow and screenwriter Mark Boal on The Hurt Locker.