Movie Reviews - Page 3

Review: ‘Sicario’ Is One of the Most Intense Movies of the Year

by Matt Singer September 10, 2015 @ 3:42 PM
‘Sicario’ is an exercise in prolonged tension like few others. Every moment from the first scene to the last is suspenseful. The opening, a deadly raid on a drug kingpin’s safe house establishes a terrifying precedent: In this film, violence can erupt at any time without any warning, and no one and nothing can be trusted. Having thoroughly unsettled the audience, director Denis Villeneuve keeps viewers on edge with shifty characters, sudden bursts of gunfire, and the careful use of a persistent, pounding score. Remember the scene in Boogie Nights where Alfred Molina is randomly tossing firecrackers at Mark Wahlberg and John C. Reilly? Sicario is like that scene for two straight hours with no “Sister Christian.” It is intense.

‘Hitchcock/Truffaut’ Review: One of the Best Film Books of All Time Is Now a Movie

by Matt Singer September 10, 2015 @ 2:46 PM
Courtesy of TIFF
In 1962, Alfred Hitchcock and Francois Truffaut spent a week in a room at Universal Studios talking about movies. That interview became the book Hitchcock/Truffaut, which proceeds systematically as the two explore Hitchcock’s career, analyzing each of his films one by one. The discussion wasn’t filmed, but the audio was recorded, and now that audio forms the spine of Kent Jones’ Hitchcock/Truffaut documentary, which doesn’t so much adapt the book as it does bring it to life onscreen. Hearing Hitchcock and Truffaut makes clear something that’s easy to forget reading words on a page: That this conversation — maybe the greatest ever on the subject of films and filmmaking — was conducted through a translator. Hitchcock didn’t know French; Truffaut couldn’t understand English. But both spoke the language of cinema, which transcends communicative limitations.

‘Hitman: Agent 47’ Review: The Hitman’s Name Is Agent 47, So Technically the Title of This Movie is ‘Hitman: Hitman’

by Matt Singer August 19, 2015 @ 10:39 AM
20th Century Fox
Agent 47 is a perfect assassin, designed in a lab to kill with ruthless efficiency and accuracy. Mad scientists tweaked his genetics to enhance his toughness and diminish his emotions, because emotions make people weak. In his line of work — murdering people, all day, everyday, for money — it is better not to feel.

‘American Ultra’ Review: A Stoned Cold Spy Comedy/Romance/Thriller

by Matt Singer August 18, 2015 @ 11:01 AM
A late August release date typically means one of two things: A movie is terrible or a movie is weird — and therefore difficult to market. American Ultra is a classic example of the latter. The trailers and posters mostly sell it as a wacky stoner action comedy, but drug humor actually plays a fairly small part in the film, which cycles through scenes of bloody horror, government conspiracy, and sincere relationship melodrama. Audiences might go in to American Ultra expecting The Bourne Identity meets Half Baked. They’re going to find something much stranger and more interesting (with a bunch of First Blood and a smidge of rom-com tossed in the mix).

Review: ‘Fantastic Four’ Is a Complete Bore

by Mike Sampson August 6, 2015 @ 7:52 AM
20th Century Fox
Here’s the thing about this Fantastic Four movie: it was supposed to be horrible. This movie has been riding an almost unprecedented level of bad buzz since earlier this year. Strangely, it seems to have started over literally nothing. Fans were upset they hadn’t seen anything official from the movie and began to suspect it stunk. Then, depending on who you talk to, the director was fired, the actors were upset and the script was a mess. But, the days of speculation are over and none of that bad buzz matters any more; there’s an actual film that can be judged on its own merits. Sadly, Fantastic Four, on its own merits, is still horrible.

‘The Gift’ Review: Presenting A Surprising Directorial Debut From Joel Edgerton

by Matt Singer August 3, 2015 @ 9:35 AM
STX Entertainment
There are a fair number of scares in The Gift, but the most shocking part of the film isn’t the sudden appearance of a mysterious package or a creepy guy popping out of the shadows; it’s the way the film’s resident creepy guy is slowly revealed as a man with a broken heart and genuine feelings. When he’s introduced, Gordo (Joel Edgerton) gives off an unsettling vibe. His conversations are awkward and stilted; his clothes make him look like a time traveler from the early ’90s. But the more time The Gift spends with him the less threatening he appears — or at least the more threatening his supposed victims become.

‘Vacation’ Review: This Sad Sequel Truly Is a Road Trip from Hell

by Matt Singer July 28, 2015 @ 11:35 AM
New Line
Full disclosure: I missed the last 10 minutes of Vacation. Last night’s press screening started 20 minutes late, then began without any sound, which lead to a 10 minute delay to correct the technical difficulties. With an unbreakable engagement elsewhere, I had to sneak out right before the very last scene. So take this review with as many grains of salt as you’d like. If you think those final minutes might recontextualize everything that came before to transform a generally miserable comedy into a beacon of transcendent hilarity, so be it. Having sat through the previous 90 minutes, I’m of the opinion that nothing short of the long-lost missing footage from Orson Welles’ Magnificent Ambersons could have redeemed this dreadful film.

‘Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation’ Review: After 20 Years, This Franchise Is Still Improbably Good

by Matt Singer July 24, 2015 @ 10:16 AM
Alec Baldwin is just four years older than Tom Cruise. In the mid-’90s, they were both action stars. When the first Mission: Impossible movie came out in 1996, it would not have been inconceivable in the slightest for Baldwin to play super-spy Ethan Hunt; Baldwin was the first actor to play the role of super-spy Jack Ryan in 1990’s The Hunt For Red October; in 1994, he headlined a pair of big Hollywood productions, The Shadow and The Getaway.

‘Pixels’ Review: Adam Sandler Versus Video-Game Characters, His Palpable Sense of Boredom

by Matt Singer July 22, 2015 @ 11:00 AM
Adam Sandler used to make comedies. Now he makes Adam Sandler movies; bland exercises in nostalgia where he hangs out with his actor buddies, cracks a few jokes, and exerts as little effort as is humanly possible to the sounds of early ’80s rock and pop. Pixels is the latest and canniest Adam Sandler movie yet. It mines his older audience’s affection for the classic arcade games of their youth, and his younger audience’s affection for the ideas of video games coming to life. The famous gaming cameos are sure to make Pixels a huge hit, even though it’s just as unfunny as everything else Sandler produces these days.