Movie Reviews - Page 3

‘Zootopia’ Review: Disney Animation’s Most Important and Political Film Yet

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by Erin Whitney March 3, 2016 @ 3:29 PM
Disney
In the beginning of Disney’s ‘Zootopia,’ Judy Hopper, a young determined bunny with big aspirations, is told by her parents that complacency is better than chasing your dreams. “You know why your mom and I ended up so happy?” her small town carrot farmer dad asks. “We gave up on our dreams and settled!” At first ‘Zootopia’ might seem like Disney once again banging their follow-your-dreams and never-give-up drum, but it quickly overcomes that outdated adage. Instead, Judy’s story of perseverance becomes the entry point for a larger movie about the tough realizations that come with leaving a bubble of blind comfort, and one that uses he animal kingdom to comment on prejudice, race relations and police brutality.

‘Whiskey Tango Foxtrot’ Review: Tina Fey Makes ‘Zero Dark Forty’ Very Watchable

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by Britt Hayes March 3, 2016 @ 9:25 AM
Paramount
Tina Fey has proven herself capable of elevating some fairly mediocre material (remember Admission? Of course you don’t), and while Whiskey Tango Foxtrot hardly presents a formidable challenge, it does put that theory to the test. The latest film from the directors of Crazy Stupid Love and Focus is just as glossy as its predecessors, but without the comedic vibrance of Fey, Whiskey Tango Foxtrot could have easily resulted in a spiritual successor to Eat, Pray, Love.

‘Knight of Cups’ Review: Terrence Malick at His Most Experimental and Abstract

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by Erin Whitney March 1, 2016 @ 12:51 PM
Broad Green Pictures
In a deck of tarot cards, the Knight of Cups can signal two sides in need of balance. The armored knight atop a white horse can be a sensitive man, though one controlled by his temperamental emotions. He can be imaginative, though a dreamer distracted by fantasy, a romantic, but selfish with desires for stimulation. When the card appears in the reverse in a reading, it can signify a life struggling in transition, and a descent toward recklessness or disappointment. So is the journey of Christian Bale’s Rick, a disenchanted Hollywood screenwriter in Terrence Malick‘s ‘Knight of Cups,’ a knight trotting through a haze who seeks realization after he’s grown weary by the artifice that surrounds him.

‘How to Be Single’ Review: Dakota Johnson’s in an Empire State of Mind

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by Matt Singer February 12, 2016 @ 11:51 AM
Warner Bros.
As a 35-year-old married father of one with a dog and an apartment in the parkest slopiest part of Park Slope, I recognize that I am not the target audience for How to Be Single. I haven’t been single since March of 2000 when I started dating my wife. I spent my “wild” 20s in New York City hanging out in video stores and karaoke bars. Hell, at our age, I may not even be married to the target audience for How to Be Single at this point. (Don’t tell my wife I said that. Seriously. Please don’t.) But you know what? I liked this movie anyway, enough to acknowledge that someone who is in its target demo will probably enjoy it too.

‘Zoolander 2’ Review: This Comedy Sequel Will Leave You Feeling Blue (Steel)

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by Matt Singer February 10, 2016 @ 9:34 AM
Paramount
Is there a documented record for the most celebrity cameos in a single film? If there was, Zoolander 2 just broke it. The film opens with the murder of Justin Bieber and closes with ... well, without spoiling it, let’s say it closes with a whole slew of more cameos, and there’s at least 20 more in between. These are some of the biggest names from the world of fashion, music, TV, film, journalism, and pop culture. If Zoolander 2 was a party, the guest list alone would make it the greatest ever thrown. But Zoolander 2 is not a party. It is a movie. A bad movie. Never have so many cool people appeared in something so patently lame — or, as idiot male model Derek Zoolander mispronounces it, “luh-may.”

‘Deadpool’ Review: A Faithful, But Not Particularly Funny, Superhero Movie

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by Matt Singer February 7, 2016 @ 7:04 AM
20th Century Fox
Most comic book movies are meant to appeal to 12-year-olds. Deadpool is the first one feel like it was actually written by one. Gleefully puerile and deeply immature, it has plenty of what the MPAA calls “adult content,” but no actual content for adults; it’s just non-stop dick jokes (and ball jokes), bloody violence, and fourth wall breaks. In other words, it will be the favorite movie of 2016 of every underage boy who sneaks into it next weekend.

‘Hail, Caesar!’ Review: Hooray For the Coens’ Hollywood

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by Matt Singer February 3, 2016 @ 8:01 AM
Universal
Over the course of their 30-year careers, the Coen brothers have made a lot of different kinds of movies; madcap comedies, period dramas, detective mysteries, bouncy musicals, thrilling Westerns, and biting satires. Hail, Caesar! is the first time they’ve made all those different kinds of movies simultaneously. Though it has an overarching story — a movie star gets kidnapped in the middle of a major production — Hail, Caesar!’s Hollywood studio setting offers the Coens the opportunity for a series of delightful digressions. As its protagonist, studio boss Eddie Mannix (Josh Brolin), wanders the Capitol Pictures backlot, the Coens’ wander through every imaginable style and genre from the American film industry’s Golden Age. Hail, Caesar! features so many different styles and genres, in fact, that it almost qualifies as an anthology film, one that finds the Coens at their most versatile and playful.

‘Certain Women’ Review: Three Vignettes Form Kelly Reichardt’s Tale of Montana Women

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by Erin Whitney February 1, 2016 @ 11:00 AM
filmscience
‘Certain Women,’ the latest from Kelly Reichardt based on the short stories of Maile Meloy, is made up of three loosely interwoven vignettes about women living in Montana. There’s a lawyer, a wife and a farmer whose lives are each interrupted by something unexpecte