Movie Reviews - Page 4

‘How to Be Single’ Review: Dakota Johnson’s in an Empire State of Mind

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by Matt Singer February 12, 2016 @ 11:51 AM
Warner Bros.
As a 35-year-old married father of one with a dog and an apartment in the parkest slopiest part of Park Slope, I recognize that I am not the target audience for How to Be Single. I haven’t been single since March of 2000 when I started dating my wife. I spent my “wild” 20s in New York City hanging out in video stores and karaoke bars. Hell, at our age, I may not even be married to the target audience for How to Be Single at this point. (Don’t tell my wife I said that. Seriously. Please don’t.) But you know what? I liked this movie anyway, enough to acknowledge that someone who is in its target demo will probably enjoy it too.

‘Zoolander 2’ Review: This Comedy Sequel Will Leave You Feeling Blue (Steel)

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by Matt Singer February 10, 2016 @ 9:34 AM
Paramount
Is there a documented record for the most celebrity cameos in a single film? If there was, Zoolander 2 just broke it. The film opens with the murder of Justin Bieber and closes with ... well, without spoiling it, let’s say it closes with a whole slew of more cameos, and there’s at least 20 more in between. These are some of the biggest names from the world of fashion, music, TV, film, journalism, and pop culture. If Zoolander 2 was a party, the guest list alone would make it the greatest ever thrown. But Zoolander 2 is not a party. It is a movie. A bad movie. Never have so many cool people appeared in something so patently lame — or, as idiot male model Derek Zoolander mispronounces it, “luh-may.”

‘Deadpool’ Review: A Faithful, But Not Particularly Funny, Superhero Movie

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by Matt Singer February 7, 2016 @ 7:04 AM
20th Century Fox
Most comic book movies are meant to appeal to 12-year-olds. Deadpool is the first one feel like it was actually written by one. Gleefully puerile and deeply immature, it has plenty of what the MPAA calls “adult content,” but no actual content for adults; it’s just non-stop dick jokes (and ball jokes), bloody violence, and fourth wall breaks. In other words, it will be the favorite movie of 2016 of every underage boy who sneaks into it next weekend.

‘Hail, Caesar!’ Review: Hooray For the Coens’ Hollywood

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by Matt Singer February 3, 2016 @ 8:01 AM
Universal
Over the course of their 30-year careers, the Coen brothers have made a lot of different kinds of movies; madcap comedies, period dramas, detective mysteries, bouncy musicals, thrilling Westerns, and biting satires. Hail, Caesar! is the first time they’ve made all those different kinds of movies simultaneously. Though it has an overarching story — a movie star gets kidnapped in the middle of a major production — Hail, Caesar!’s Hollywood studio setting offers the Coens the opportunity for a series of delightful digressions. As its protagonist, studio boss Eddie Mannix (Josh Brolin), wanders the Capitol Pictures backlot, the Coens’ wander through every imaginable style and genre from the American film industry’s Golden Age. Hail, Caesar! features so many different styles and genres, in fact, that it almost qualifies as an anthology film, one that finds the Coens at their most versatile and playful.

‘Certain Women’ Review: Three Vignettes Form Kelly Reichardt’s Tale of Montana Women

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by Erin Whitney February 1, 2016 @ 11:00 AM
filmscience
‘Certain Women,’ the latest from Kelly Reichardt based on the short stories of Maile Meloy, is made up of three loosely interwoven vignettes about women living in Montana. There’s a lawyer, a wife and a farmer whose lives are each interrupted by something unexpecte

‘Little Men’ Review: Ira Sachs’ Touching Drama on Boyhood, Friendship and Gentrification

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by Erin Whitney January 28, 2016 @ 3:33 PM
Sundance Film Festival
Few filmmakers capture male relationships with as much compassion and New Yorkers with as much authenticity as Ira Sachs does. In ‘Little Men,’ the follow-up to 2014's ‘Love Is Strange,’ the filmmaker once again looks at two lives pulled apart by financial woes and the New York housing system. In the 2014 drama his leads were a newlywed gay couple forced to move out of their Manhattan apartment, and in his latest Sachs shifts his focus to two teenage boys caught in the middle of a lease dispute.

‘The Finest Hours’ Review: Solid Historical Drama Amidst Stormy Seas

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by Matt Singer January 26, 2016 @ 10:59 AM
Disney
For decades, there’s been a clear delineation of roles in the Affleck clan: Ben’s the leading man, Casey’s the character actor. Ben has the perfect chin and lustrous hair, not to mention the major height advantage. (He’s almost half a foot taller than Casey, according to IMDb.) Even when Casey Affleck takes a central role in a film, it’s almost always in material that explores the unlikelihood of a guy like him becoming a hero (think The Assassination of Jesse James By the Coward Robert Ford or Gone Baby Gone). But that’s not the case with the new historical adventure The Finest Hours. There’s nothing quirky or unconventional about Affleck’s charisma here. Even with a more traditional leading man co-anchoring the story and serving as its de facto protagonist, Affleck commands the screen with quiet, steely resolve and intense eyes. At 40 years old, he’s blossomed into a full-fledged movie star.

‘Sing Street’ Review: The Next Great Musical From the Director of ‘Once’

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by Mike Sampson January 25, 2016 @ 10:09 AM
The Weinstein Co.
Is it OK to jump out of your seat and the end of the movie and pump your fist with excitement like it’s the end of an epic, transcendent rock concert? Because that’s what I wanted to do at the end of Sing Street, the latest romance musical film from...