Charlie Hunnam

‘King Arthur: Legend of the Sword’ Review: This Superheroic Spin on a Classic Could Use More Personality

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by Matt Singer May 9, 2017 @ 10:58 AM
Warner Bros.
The last King Arthur movie from 2004, the one directed by Antoine Fuqua and starring Clive Owen and Keira Knightley, made just $52 million domestically against a $120 million budget, numbers that don’t exactly suggest a hungry audience clamoring for more Arthurian content. But not even a marginally popular brand is immune to Hollywood’s current reboot fixation, and so here is Guy Ritchie’s King Arthur: Legend of the Sword. Fuqua’s version, made in the wake of Gladiator, purported to be “the untold true story that inspired the legend.” Ritchie takes more liberties, unless I’m mistaken and the real Arthur’s dad fought elephants the size of mountains and wielded a sword that could stop time. His film draws inspiration from superhero stories and medieval fantasy shows. The target audience for his film appears to be people who wish Game of Thrones was less complicated and didn’t have any sex or nudity.

‘King Arthur: Legend of the Sword’ Releases, Um, Nine New Clips

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by Matthew Monagle April 30, 2017 @ 9:49 PM
Warner Bros.
I’m not sure why, but I’m really excited for Guy Ritchie’s King Arthur: Legend of the Sword. Maybe it’s because I’m a sucker for a supporting class that includes Eric Bana and Jude Law leveling up his Young Pope to a Young Evil Sorcerer. Maybe it’s because the last few trailers featured music by Led Zeppelin and I really enjoyed the synergy of folk-inspired rock with the film. Or maybe it’s just because there’s something endearing about Ritchie’s fight aesthetic, one that seems about ten years out of date (or whenever it was the last Matrix movie hit theaters).

‘The Lost City of Z’ Review: An Epic Journey to Another Time and Place

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by Matt Singer April 10, 2017 @ 12:04 PM
Amazon Studios
Less than 100 years ago, there were still uncharted areas of this planet. In an age of cell phones, satellite images, and instantaneous access to the totality of human information, it can be difficult to envision such an era — at least until a film like The Lost City of Z brings it to vivid life.

Behold, the Pulp Masterpiece That Is the Final ‘King Arthur: Legend of the Sword’ Trailer

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by Matthew Monagle April 1, 2017 @ 11:53 AM
Warner Bros.
Popular culture travels in waves. A decade or so ago, when every studio was trying to copy The Matrix and start their own action franchises dripping with self-serious stylization and slow-motion fights, I would’ve killed for a summer movie that took a grounded approach to heroes and villains. Now, after several years of Marvel movies and grimdark blockbusters, the pendulum has swung back the other way. It’s not that Guy Ritchie’s King Arthur: Legend of the Sword looks like a good movie, per se. It’s just that I’m in a place where I can really appreciate its goofiness.

See the Epic Scope of James Gray’s New ‘Lost City of Z’ Trailer

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by Emma Stefansky March 8, 2017 @ 7:12 PM
Aidan Monaghan
James Gray’s newest film The Lost City of Z has quietly become a hit with critics and Gray devotees ever since debuting at last year’s New York Film Festival. It’s about to hit theaters here, and its newest trailer, while the briefest look we’ve gotten of it so far, shows off the immense scope of what looks like a modern movie that dreams of being an Old Hollywood epic.

Jam Out With Led Zeppelin in the Latest ‘King Arthur: Legend of the Sword’ Trailer

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by Matthew Monagle February 20, 2017 @ 12:47 PM
Warner Bros.
It’s amazing how much difference a song makes. We’ve been treated to several teasers for Guy Ritchie’s upcoming King Arthur: Legend of the Sword movie, and to this point, I would have described them all as just OK. Ritchie’s particular brand of historical fiction and modern action aesthetics  —  including his signature fast-slow-fast brand of fight choreography —  is something I’ve gone back and forth on a little bit in the last few years. I’m not a big fan of Ritchie’s Sherlock Holmes movies, but I did rather enjoy The Man From U.N.C.L.E., meaning King Arthur was kind of a net zero in my book.

Charlie Hunnam’s a Man on a Mission in New ‘Lost City of Z’ Trailer

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by Charles Bramesco February 2, 2017 @ 11:23 AM
James Gray got played hard on his last release, the classically-minded drama The Immigrant. The film earned rapturous reviews out of its premiere at Cannes and landed a distribution deal with the power players at the Weinstein Company — who then let it languish in obscurity before quietly releasing it over a year later. The film was a triumph among critics but a huge missed opportunity from an industry perspective. Hopefully, Gray will have a better go with the less domineering Amazon Studios, who will release his new picture The Lost City of Z in April.

‘King Arthur’ Promises a King in New Poster, Teaser Trailer

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by Matthew Monagle January 22, 2017 @ 10:52 AM
Warner Bros.
Is Guy Ritchie still one of our most interesting Hollywood filmmakers? After beginning his career with indie standouts Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels and Snatch, Ritchie has settled into a kind of forgettable jumble of big budget movies that hold their own both with critics and at the box office. I would certainly describe the Sherlock Holmes movies and The Man From U.N.C.L.E. as solid, but ‘solid’ isn’t the type of praise we typically issue to one of our best directors. And King Arthur: Legend of the Sword seems ready to continue this streak. The Arthurian legend with GoPros? Solid. Not great, but solid.

Robert Pattinson and Charlie Hunnam Enter the Heart of Darkness in ‘The Lost City of Z’ Teaser

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by Charles Bramesco December 22, 2016 @ 10:06 AM
Aidan Monaghan
James Gray's latest effort The Lost City of Z caused no small commotion when it debuted earlier this year to close out the New York Film Festival. The filmmaker already enjoys a small but dedicated fanbase, and after his 2014 film The Immigrant got all but buried by its distributor the Weinstein Company, Gray's devotees were eager to see what he'd cooked up this time. Among the splashy debuts for The 13th and 20th Century Women, Gray delivered a work of knotted moralities and visual splendor, and those parties present left the theatre with a consensus of breathless praise. Now, we commoners can get an eyeful of the film before its debut in April from Amazon and Bleecker Street.